Hollyanne – ‘With You’

The video opens with Holly Anne’s hand stretching towards the sky like that of a bride, emerging from the grave, soon to be undead.

In a stunning white dress, the audience readily only gets confirmation, that she is indeed – was indeed – a bride to be. The veil appears at some point throughout the video – Anne, plays with it, blissfully,

The video is light, bright, luminescent. The performance is mixed with the flashing screens of dandelions, daffodils, hyacinths and other blossoming flowers. Etchings and polaroids of  all things spring / summer – only adding to the emotional sob fest seeing how outside the window –  the winter season is approaching.

Pleasant to watch  – refreshing. It’s not covered with an overwhelming amount of glitch and grain filters – the familiar throwbacks to the vintage 80’s – but makes quite a different take on the retro rehash.

Mainly blurring and blending, fading in and out from the pastel, delicate tones of the semi – transparent plant layers to the bride-that-could-have been against the serene white backdrop.

She is single and she is happy –  avoided a relationship that could have brought her misery, disappointment and suffering.

One can’t help but wonder if it’s a “spiritual” follow up to the previous single “Carry On” which was a much more joyful, “pop art-esque” animation, filled with neon colours, impulsive movements and punchy vibes. “Carry on, love hurts, I’m not sure – if I try, could I give you enough?” Looks like she went quite a way from trying to please to trying to ditch.

The song itself, like the rest of the artist’s music, is an easily digestible 90’s track.

Reminding of those hits you heard on MTV when you were a 90s kid, switching on the channel secretly, hoping the parents won’t find out you’re not asleep.

The subdued beats, synth layers, the distinctive sound of pop, the disco ball reflecting the dance floor lights, and the unmistakable melodic female lead voice with a touch of electronic treatment – it’s all there. 

All in all it’s a 8/10 – for originality, experience, not to sound cheesy  – but brightness in fairly murky times and the successful runaway. 

Words By Diana Govina